Tips for Overcoming Test Anxiety

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Test anxiety is a big deal – it can play a huge role in thinking ability and performance. It can cause somebody to ‘blank out’ on tests, and can lead to racing thoughts that are difficult to control. It is also incredibly common for individuals who have ADHD. Yes, all students experience stress and anxiety when it comes to tests, but ADHD often adds another layer where there is a much higher risk of becoming overwhelmed by it...

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In case you missed it: Our guide to student life and ADHD

If you’re a student in college or university, or are thinking about going away for school, you may be interested in checking out Springboard Clinic’s Guide to Student Life and ADHD. This is an online publication that we put together for you, the student, and so far it has been getting rave reviews from the masses (read: our other team members LOVE it).

Not a student? No problem – a lot of the information in our guide can be useful to anyone with ADHD. Still not interested? Pass it on to the students in your life who may need a good read!

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Bill of Rights for Children with ADHD

Today is “National Child Day” in Canada – a day that “marks the occasion when Canada adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), spelling out the basic human rights for children and youth.” While you may not be interested in reading the actual document, the sentiment behind National Child Day is an awesome one. It is about “celebrating children as active participants in their own lives and in communities, as active citizens who can and should meaningfully contribute to decision-making.”

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ADHD Friendly Goal Setting: When SMART goals aren’t quite smart enough…

When it comes to goal setting and ADHD, SMART goals are important, but we think there’s more to it…

First of all, whether or not you’ve heard of SMART goals before, you’ve likely been told at one point that you’re much more likely to accomplish a goal when it’s clearly defined. What we mean by this is that you’re much more likely to get to the gym if you set out a goal to “go to the gym at my school once a week after class for a month” versus if you say you’re going to “start going to the gym.”

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