Keep fighting the good fight: How remembering you have ADHD is actually the secret to beating it.

Receiving a diagnosis of ADHD is not an end point. Instead, it is an opportunity for a new beginning. By realizing that ADHD is actually a brain difference, you can put some context into your past, and help you understand why you often feel the way you feel. So, if the process is done right, a diagnosis is a chance for transformation, for change, and for individual growth.

Coming to terms with having ADHD is not about feeling guilt, or shame, or feeling bad about yourself. And it shouldn’t be about receiving a label either. It should be an empowering experience with the opportunity to build self-awareness, with the goal of getting closer to finding your true self.

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6 Common Myths about ADHD

There are many widely-held beliefs about ADHD that can lead people to dismiss a diagnosis. In reality, ADHD is not only real, but it is also highly researched. Our understanding of the disorder is evolving, but there are some common myths that we can dispel with confidence.

Here are six reasons why people might dismiss a diagnosis, based on common myths about ADHD...

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Be a step ahead this March Break: 5 must-ask questions before you hop on that plane!

Have you ever found yourself wandering along with a crowd, on your ‘vacation’ thinking: I don’t even like (insert whatever you are currently doing)?” 

Too often, we get so excited about the concept of a holiday that we just follow along with what the guide book says and don’t customize it to fit our own wants and needs, or the strengths and limitations of those traveling with us. You do the “must sees’ according to someone else, or hop on a pre-planned itinerary and skip the necessary steps to make it yours. You forget to ask yourself the meaningful questions about what you are wanting out of this time, and instead find yourself on holiday thinking “it would have been more relaxing to just stay home.”

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Lessons learned as a remote-working entrepreneur

Working from home ADHDManaging a business is difficult. Being a parent is difficult. Throw some attention issues and a cross country move into the mix and suddenly you have a glimpse into the life of one of our founders, Laura. More and more, remote working is becoming a norm for Canadians. While seen as a perk by many, it can also pose challenges for those involved - managing competing priorities being at the top of that list.

Today we're sharing Laura's post about how she has managed to navigate her own family's needs while also running Springboard Clinic from a distance. Here are her top six tips for finding balance while working from home: http://bit.ly/2HN3cKp

An open letter to our social media community and our clients

On behalf of Springboard Clinic, I am thrilled to announce that we are launching Springboard social media channels. We believe that by spreading Springboard’s message of hope, we can be an influential voice for reducing stigma and building awareness for attention issues and the mood challenges that often go alongside. We would like to be a venue for building community, compassion, and sharing strategies for individuals of all ages.

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Check IN before you lash OUT: 5 essential steps to changing your relationship dynamic

I sat in a small rural church in Ontario about 5 years ago listening to a minister marry two of my closest friends. I had only been married myself a couple of years then, and I too was asking questions about what long term partnership is all about. She shared some advice that day that has always stuck with me. As I remember it, she looked out at our young crew and said: “A successful marriage takes two people who are both giving 80%. That it is not about each of you giving 50%. It is about both of you giving your all, all the time”

In marriage (especially when ADHD is in the picture), it can be downright exhausting to give your all, all the time. You feel like you are already giving endlessly. And you’re overwhelmed. Often, you look over to your partner and inevitably end up saying, “So what have you done for me, lately?”

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